WUI HAM RADIO ANTENNA INSTALLATIONS
at www.w0ui.com

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ANTENNA ARRAYS IN USE AT WUI

MOSLEY PRO-67-C-3 ANTENNA
Yagi for 40, 30, 20, 17, 15, 12, 10 meter ham bands
It is mounted on the 51-foot Tri-Ex WT-51 crank up tower and served by a Ham-IV rotator.

PENDING ANTENNA ACTIVITIES:

After three decades spanning two Log Periodics, now retired from US Army (DoD) MARS and 
looking at the threats of a declining Solar Cycle 24 and predictions of a meager Solar Cycle 25,

To prepare for Solar Cycle 24's bottom and a possible poor performance by the next Solar Peak 25, 
the primary goal was to add 40 and 30 meters onto the tower and not lose what the Log Periodic already provided (20, 17, 15, 12, and 10 meters).

Everyone has opinions and emotions on antenna issues.
During the analysis process, Woody attempted to consider factors 
such as performance, construction and in-service support.

Other primary antennas considered included:  
Optibeam OB15-7 15-element yagi/22-ft boom/25sqft load, 
Steppir DB18E  3-element/19-ft boom/12.1sqft load, 
M2 7&10-30LP8 8-element/30-ft boom/13sqft load
(and others).
For various reasons these possibilities were eventually set aside.
The M2 7&10-30LP8 was a close second but, after reviewing available performance data, the Mosley won.

Some base their purchase decisions on appearances (they marry their spouses for the same reason).
For me, I looked at performance factors from which was my final purchase decision.
If you look at the Pro67c3 what you see is a three-element yagi for 40-meters plus smaller elements for the other bands.
Focus on the three-element yagi part and the other components begin to just blend in.

Some don't like traps.
That said, this antenna outperforms the Log and the traps will outlive me.
To all their own opinions. For me, no regrets.


 

 

 

The Mosley Pro67c-3 arrived by truck
Three of the four boxes showed signs of damage during shipment so we opened the damaged areas before signing acceptance of the antenna.
The truck driver worked with me to open and examine box contents for damage.
The antenna components were well packed within the boxes, however, and no signs of damage were observed.

The Mosley Pro67c-3 boxes are some of the last still in the now-empty semi-trailer The Mosley Pro67c-3 boxes are some of the last still in the now-empty semi-trailer We transferred the boxes from the trailer into the bed of the truck for transport down to the barn Inspection of the boxes prior to signing for them was a must Inspection of the boxes prior to signing for them was a must Inspection of the boxes prior to signing for them was a must We opened three boxes that showed signs of crushing but were relieved  to find no internal damage to antenna parts. We opened three boxes that showed signs of crushing but were relieved  to find no internal damage to antenna parts 
The antenna in the barn awaiting assembly and installation The antenna in the barn awaiting assembly and installation 


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TRI-EX WT-51 TOWER STATISTICS:
When fully extended to the highest 51-foot (15.5m) height, the tower was rated for:
9-sqft (.84m2) of antenna area at 50 mph (80kph)
5-sqft  of antenna area at 70 mph
3-sqft of antenna area at 80 mph
Figure add-or-loss of 2-sqft per 10-mph
Dead Load rated at 150 pounds (68kg) max
The tower nests down to a 21-foot (6.4m) height and contains 417-pounds of steel
Additional information about the 51-foot Tri-Ex WT-51 crank-up tower.

During the transition from the Log Periodic over to the Mosley Pro67c-3 
I worked with the Tri-Ex tower manufacturer to update the aging steel crank-up cable as well as the thrust bearing.
My interface with the manufacturer owner was very pleasant.
I can highly recommend them as competent and caring professionals.
Norman Tashjian
Tashjian Towers Corporation
2765 S. Temperance Ave., Fowler, Ca. 93625
Ph: 559-834-4300
Fax: 559-834-4377 


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Ham IV Rotator
A new Ham-IV rotator was purchased from Norm's Rotor Service and installed in 2012 to replace the former rotor.
Cutting of the rotor place was required.
Since the new Ham-IV rotor had a different connector, a template was made to properly cut the rotor plate.  The rotorplate originally had only the round center hole. I cut it further to allow for the new-style rotor connector. Examining the bottom of the rotor plate, I noticed that lock washers had severely gouged into the aluminum. Additional washers were added now protecting the rotor plate from further damage. 
 I went up after this photo was taken and added additional washers to protect the rotor plate from lock-washer damage. This photo shows the rotor being secured in a way that the lock washers will no longer dig into the softer aluminum rotor plate. The top of the Tri-Ex tower showing the thrust bearing and antenna mount. Woody's wife, Lorelei, on the ground with a compass pointing the way.
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Older original-model
GAP VOYAGER DX-4
Vertical for 160, 80, 40, 20 meter ham bands


Above: The GAP Voyager DX-4 45-foot (13.7 meter) tall vertical provides coverage on 160, 80, 40 and 20 meters.

Radiowavz

DOUBLE-BAZOOKA  ANTENNAS
for the 80 and 60 meter ham bands
Other Bazooka antennas for 160, 40 and 30 meters have been retired and sold.
Spitting rain mixed with snow. What a better November day to do outside antenna work. Here the mast is ready to receive the Double Bazooka antennas. It is not up all the way, I will wait for spring enhancements to do that. In the spring I expect to lower it to install a ground-ring lightning protection system on it.

An aerial view of the ranch showing the wire-antenna planning. The 160-meter antenna is installed along the same path as the other wire antennas and not a direct run as shown in this earlier drawing.
Above: Planning for the new wire-antenna environment was obviously the first step.
The above photo was taken by Lorelei from the Cessna.
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Below: The series of end supports for six wire-based antennas mounted to the Tri-Ex crank up tower.
Pullies on all three supports allow raising and lower (for maintenance, enhancements, adjustments, etc) from the ground.
Five "Double-Bazooka" antennas are in the lineup with one spare for experimentation or growth.

From the Tri-Ex tower we see the rope pully supports. Looking NNW From the Tri-Ex tower we see the rope pully supports. Looking NNE

WIRE ANTENNA SUPPORT STRUCTURES
Woody set up this old 28-foot (nests down to 14-feet) crank-up tower for the dipole installation.
The John Deere 750 tractor made tower installation significantly easier.
It is the center support for Woody's 160, 80, 60, 40, and 30-meter Double Bazooka wire antennas
The John Deere 750 tractor picked up and moved the old tower effortlessly The original guy wires were still attached! While not effortless, tower installation work was somewhat simplified with the use of the tractor.
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Here the 51-foot Tri-Ex tower (left) supports the south end of the wire antenna arrays. The 35-foot crankup provides the middle support for all but the 160-meter wire (visible to the right of the Tri-Ex). The MM-715 Mast is visible out in the distance just to the right of the middle tower. Here shows the tower nested down at 14-feet

This is an Antenna Products (of Mineral Wells, Texas) MM-715 32-foot Telescopic Mast
This 26-pound mast unit nests down to about 6-feet and telescopes up to just over 32-feet.
Not overly strong, so far it has successfully withstood the high winds common to this 7000-foot (2133 meter) installation.
It supports the ends of the wire antennas.
When fully extended and properly guyed it is roughly rated as follows: 

MPH SQ FOOT
20 20
30 10
40 5
50 3
60 2

Installation is on a poured concrete pad with four concrete-embedded eyelets for the guy wires.  
The John Deere Gator aided in the installation effort.
Spitting rain mixed with snow. What a better November day to do outside antenna work. Here the mast is ready to receive the Double Bazooka antennas. It is not up all the way, I will wait for spring enhancements to do that. In the spring I expect to lower it to install a ground-ring lightning protection system on it.

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AN  MFJ-2013 60-and-30-meter OFF CENTER FED dipole
This antenna is available as a custom-order from MFJ.
It was installed without incident and seems to work pretty well on the two bands it was designed for.

AN  MFJ-17758 80-and-40-meter TRAP DIPOLE
This dual band antenna works pretty well for the bands to which it was designed.
It will likely be retired to field day or Go-Kit status during the summer of 2015.
The MFJ-17758 80 and 40 meter trap dipole



ANTENNAS IN THE ATTIC

AN  MFJ-17758 80-and-40-meter TRAP DIPOLE IN THE ATTIC

As the residence is on a 7000-foot (2133-meter) ridge, high winds and lightning are not uncommon.
Outside arrays are disconnected and grounded when there is the slightest possibility of lightning.
To this end Woody installed an MFJ-17758 80-40 meter trap dipole in the attic.
That way, hamming can be done if outside antenna arrays are grounded due to any prediction of lightning storms.
While in-attic antennas are not as ideal as outside antennas, they do serve a purpose and certainly can perform fairly well.
There are no regrets for the installation of this array.
In the attic it does not hear very well compared to an ourdoor antenna but will have to do.
The MFJ-17758 80 and 40 meter trap dipole 
Above: The antenna laid out before installation.
Woody used black electrical tape on the "negative" side of center (above left)
and red electrical tape on the "hot" side of center (above right) 

Electric Fence standoffs on alternating studs
Above: From the local hardware store, an us$8.00 bag of nail-on electric fence standoffs made a great way to install the dipole.
The nails, made for a robust fencepost, were not driven all the way into the rafters due to the possibility of splitting the wood.
Support was provided for every on other stud
The antenna is installed on the side of the attic without the light power wires.
In the center is seen a 9-volt-battery powered smoke detector. 
At this point, the ham antenna has not had any adverse affect on it (no false alarms).

Some 18-years ago I had lights installed in the attic. 
This was a smart and recommended expense for general home maintenance.
Otherwise, you're going to be doing all of this with either flashlights or drop lights and extension cords (ugh).

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The Antenna Center is mounted The antenna center insulator
Above: The dipole center was secured to a nail with some left over exterior antenna guy rope
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Use of a 5/16-inch nutdriver makes tuning easier
Above: A hammer for the nails, a tape measure and a 5/16-inch nut-driver made the work pretty straightforward.
The instructions say to NOT actually cut any wires and 
to tune the 40-meter (center to trap) section first.
Loosen the nut and shorten the overall length to raise the frequency. 

USE OF AN ANTENNA ANALYZER IS A MUST
Since getting in and out of the attic to test tuning is a real pain,
an antenna analyzer the you can use in the attic at the center insulator is HIGHLY recommended.
IF you do not own one, check with your local ham radio club to see if you could borrow one.
CLICK TO SEE more on the MFJ-259 analyzer

SAFETY WARNING
WARNING  WARNING  WARNING

Watch your head when up there... shingle nails poking through the wood can draw some significant blood and be highly painful.
On the subject of pain, keep your head down as the wood hurts when you hit your head on the studs.
Always Always Always step only on the studs... DO NOT STEP BETWEEN THEM (onto the ceiling sheetrock).
Sheetrock is not made to support your weight.
You WILL fall right through into the room below, injuring yourself (or worse) and destroying the ceiling of that room.

Two old abandoned TV antennas do not impact performance 
Above:  The dipole strung up high but offset from center a bit.
The two (now abandoned) television antennas did not have any impact on antenna performance.
 
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FITTING An 85-FOOT DIPOLE INTO A 68-FOOT LONG ATTIC
Excess antenna ends are brought back and downward The furnace flue pipe, light power wire and heat alarm sensors have not impacted nor been impacted by the antenna
Above:  The dipole is 85-feet long but the ranch style house was only 70-feet long.
Since I didn't take it end-to-end (wall-to-wall) I had 68-feet to deal with.
The center insulator was placed near the 34-foot mark leaving 17-feet extra that had to be managed.
With (roughly) nine-feet-per-end left over, the ends were simply crossed over to the opposite side of the attic and brought back away from the end and downward.
The large furnace flue pipe at the end of the house nor the electrical wiring does not seem to have any impact on antenna performance.
A goal is that the wire of the antenna in no place ever directly touches any wood or other attic materials.

Boxes and storage do not seem to impact antenna performanace.
Above:  Empty boxes and stored materials do not seem to influence antenna performance.
In this installation from the wire-feed-through-hold on the end-insulator to the shortening-clip (the adjustment section for 80-meters) was 21-inches. 
As per the instructions, adjust the center-to-trap (40-meter) section for optimal SWR first and then to the 80-meter leg.
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As a predominate CW-operator, Woody tweaked the antenna for this portion of the 80 and 40 meter bands.

3.500 3.505 3.510 3.515 3.520 3.525 3.530 3.535 3.540 3.545 3.550
1.9 1.8 1.6 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.7 1.9
                     
7.000 7.015 7.040 7.100 7.125 7.150 7.200 7.225 7.250 7.275 7.300
1.4 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.5

Using his antenna tuner, 
Woody was able to also tune nicely on 20, 17 and 15 meters (didn't try any higher bands)
The antenna is fed from the basement hamshack into the attic via RG-213u coax.

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ANTENNAS NOW RETIRED 
FROM SERVICE:

Older original-model
TENNADYNE T-10 EAGLE HF LOG PERIODIC ANTENNA
Yagi for 30, 20, 17, 15, 12, 10 meter ham bands

Below: The Tennadyne T10 Eagle log periodic antenna array had
10-elements on a 24-foot (7.3 meter) boom and covers 13 to 30 mHz (and 10 mHz).
This antenna has performed well and stood undamaged even with some of the severe weather we get here at 7000-feet.
I actually hated to part with it and would recommend Tennadyne to anyone considering a Log Periodic antenna array.
Except for the interest to add 40 and 30 meters to the tower it would have never been retired.

It was mounted on the 51-foot Tri-Ex WT-51 crank up tower and served by a Ham-IV rotator.
The newer-style Tennadyne Model T10.10-30HD covers from 20-10 meters (13 to 30 mHz plus 10 mHz)

Below Left: Antennas in the summer's late evening gloaming - June 2013
Below Right: Fall arrives at 
WUI - October 2013


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This Tennadyne T10 Log Periodic was rated: 
24-foot boom  46-pounds  10-sqft wind area



BELOW IS A TENNADYNE FLYER RECEIVED IN AUGUST, 1992
This sales literature had specifications in it.
The T5 was bought (see photos below) for use with US Army MARS during the first Gulf War.
Later I bought the T10 which I still have and use to this day.
The T5 was sold when I retired from Army MARS.



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CLICK HERE for a PDF of the Tennadyne T10 Eagle log periodic antenna 
recommended "Collins Balun."
It is about 3.1mb, please be patient for it to download.

Older original-model
TENNADYNE T-5 HAWK HF LOG PERIODIC ANTENNA
Yagi for 20, 17, 15, 12, 10 meter ham bands
 

Above:
The
Tennadyne T5 Hawk log periodic antenna boasted five elements on a 12-foot (3.7 meter) boom and covered 13 to 30 mHz. 
I first installed this antenna in the early 1990's for Army MARS use during the original Gulf War.
It was a great antenna for In-The-City installations as five-elements on a 12-foot-boom
Overall it gave good performance on a fairly small lot and was not overly invasive to look at.
Tennadyne had originally replaced it with a six-element model (Tennadyne T-6) 
but that one has now been replaced with a 
Tennadyne T7 which boasts seven-elements on an 18-foot boom.

CLICK HERE for a PDF of my original 

Tennadyne
T5 Hawk
log periodic antenna installation guide
- It also includes information on the recommended "Collins Balun."
It is about 10mb, please be patient for it to download.




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WOODY'S OTHER ANTENNA ACTIVITIES:
Below: Working with the Colorado District 24 ARES organization, we worked to install to install amateur antennas on the Elbert County Sheriff's communications tower in Kiowa, Colorado. (Woody is the lower person on the tower)

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CLICK HERE FOR THE MAIN 4L RANCH WEB PAGE

Contact WOODY for questions or comments about this page via  email. 
All personal comments, pictures copyright 1996-2015 - R. Linwood (4L RANCH)
LAST MODIFIED:

Since 22 May, 2010


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